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July 9, 2020, 5:47 am UTC    
April 24, 2019 09:57AM
Sorry, to your question: the granite floor in the 1st Dynasty tomb of Den at Umm el-Qa'ab is often quoted as the oldest use of stone as a building material beyond just components i.e. portcullis doors, door jambs, ect.


This may be in error as Petrie reports finding "A great deal of worked limestone in large slabs had been used, whether as roofing or in some other capacity could not be decided." in the 1st Dynasty mastaba of Djet at Giza.
[dlib.nyu.edu]

The oldest to qualify as a "structure" made of stone is the the 2nd Dynasty tomb of Khasekhemwy which has a limestone floor and walls:


Of note is the Palermo Stone, supposedly from the 5th Dynasty, credits Khasekhemwy with constructing a "...stone building of “Enduring Goddess." named "Men-Netjeret". Some equate this to being Gisr-el-Mudir which I think is nonsense. The DE knew the difference between a "wall" and a "building" which the latter is specifically what the Palermo Stone refers to-not a wall. And not just any building, but one worthy of a name and dedication to a god-hardly the reverence one would give to a largely unremarkable wall.


Subject Author Posted

Is the Gisr-el-Mudir still considered the oldest stone construction

Hans April 20, 2019 06:16PM

Re: Is the Gisr-el-Mudir still considered the oldest stone construction

Thanos5150 April 21, 2019 10:49AM

Re: Is the Gisr-el-Mudir still considered the oldest stone construction

Hans April 23, 2019 10:06AM

Re: Is the Gisr-el-Mudir still considered the oldest stone construction

Thanos5150 April 24, 2019 09:57AM

Re: Is the Gisr-el-Mudir still considered the oldest stone construction

Warwick L Nixon April 24, 2019 01:45PM



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