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December 11, 2019, 9:31 pm UTC    
June 17, 2018 01:05PM
Well I decided to lighten your burden just a bit of having to believe in pi and give you this information from Wiki ...

In 1916, during the last years of the Ottoman Empire and in the middle of World War I, the German assyriologist Eckhard Unger found a copper-alloy bar while excavating at Nippur. The bar dates from c. 2650 BC and Unger claimed it was used as a measurement standard. This irregularly formed and irregularly marked graduated rule supposedly defined the Sumerian cubit as about 518.6 mm (20.42 in).

Now 22.3 is 877.95 inches and divided by 20.42 = 42.995 so I think we could be fairly accurate and say that this side was supposed to be 43 Nippur Cubits

would the other side yield a similar even amount ...

17.50 meters = 689.98 inches and divide by 20.42 = 33.74 so I think we can say the temple was supposed to measure 43 Nippur Cubits (886.66 inches or 22.52 meters) by 33.75 Nippur Cubits ( 689.175 inches or 17.505 meters)

43 / 33.75 = 1.2741
4 / Pi = 1.2732

So one could assume that in Ancient Sumeria they had come up with a simple way of calling Pi ... it would be 43 / 33.75 or to make all things even they would have:

172 / 135 = Pi ratio

172 = 4
135 = Pi

I didn't know that ... did you ?



Cherry Picking - If you can't debate your opponents on the substance of the issue, crush them on the minor details.
Subject Author Posted

Pi in Sumeria in late 4th millennium B.C.E

Don Barone June 17, 2018 12:30PM

Re: Pi in Sumeria in late 4th millennium B.C.E

Don Barone June 17, 2018 01:05PM

Re: Pi in Sumeria in late 4th millennium B.C.E

Don Barone June 18, 2018 08:52AM

Re: Pi in Sumeria in late 4th millennium B.C.E

Don Barone June 18, 2018 09:56AM



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